Archives

September, 2012

Clariol Commercial

Weeeee! with 4 minutes left to the deadline we managed to submit this Poptent spec for Clairol not enough time to sweeten the edit and audio but we go it up in time.
Thank you everybody that helped out with the project, check it out make comment as much as you can and make sure you like it.Spots shot on Red. Director: Diego Torroija, Dp: Diego Torroija, Producer Editor Jack Ho, Producer editor Richard Downie, Writer Gabriel Duran, Writer: James Mason VO: Dawn Davis

http://www.poptent.net/media/56297

Clairol Shoot

THE EPIC-M MONOCHROME

THE EPIC-M MONOCHROME

The EPIC-M MONOCHROME features the newly-developed Mysterium-X Monochrome Sensor. It has native ASA2000 and an increased net resolution thanks to the removal of the debayer process. A new low pass filter accommodates the reduced pixel pitch. The sticker price of $42,000 (for the brain only) includes the upgrade to Dragon Monochrome Sensor spring 2013. David Fincher is shooting his current project solely on Epic-M Monochrome cameras right now.

The EPIC-M MONOCHROME is available for pre-order today. It begins shipping on October

Sweet like honey

Sweet like honey

Sony’s full-frame camera

Sony shooters have long been asking for a full-frame version of their translucent mirror cameras and now it’s here in the form of the A99. The new flagship Alpha camera has a 24.3-megapixel full-frame sensor, which sounds very similar to the one found in the new RX1 super-advanced-compact. It also has the newest version of the BIONZ processing engine and a matching 100-25,600 native ISO range. It does crank up the maximum burst rate, though, to 6 fps at full-res or 10 fps in a lower-resolution tele-zoom mode.

The A99 has gotten a serious upgrade in the AF department, employing a 19-point main system as well as a 102-point focal plane phase detection AF sensor at the focal plane for dual-AF. It offers a few advanced AF features that pros will be keen on, too, like the ability to select the range of the AF, so it won’t focus on things that are too close or too far away. It even works continuously during video.

The finder is an XGA OLED Tru-Finder, which covers 100% of the frame. It even adjusts if you slap an APS-C specific lens on that doesn’t cover the whole sensor. On the traditional display side is a 1,229k-dot LCD with built-in white pixels to increase brightness and a hinge for swiveling.

The body itself has also gotten some updates, especially in the grip area. Despite its robust guts, Sony claims it’s actually the lightest full-frame interchangeable-lens camera around. The case is made from magnesium alloy and the whole thing is weather sealed to increase durability. The shutter is rated to 200,000 actuations.

Predictably, the A99 also has a serious suite of video capture functions aimed toward high-end DSLR cinematographers. it does 1080p footage at the common 24p for the cinematic look, but it also does the coveted 60p, which makes action sequences look wonderfully smooth. As previously mentioned, it has full-time AF with tracking. There’s even a silent multi-control dial on the front of the camera to adjust settings during a shot. It has a built-in headphone jack (which was once a luxury on HDSLRs) and an optional XLR adapter kit for attaching pro-grade microphones.

The body will be available in October for $2,800, which makes it cheaper than both the Nikon D800 and the Canon 5D Mark III.

In addition to the body, Sony has also announced a slew of accessories meant to be used with its new flagship camera.The VG-C99AM Vertical Grip ups the total battery capacity to three and adds vertical control buttons to the camera. It will cost a fairly hefty $380.

The new HVL-F60M flash has a built-in LED for illuminating video, as well as a traditional strobe head. It comes with a bounce adapter and color filters, as well as a price tag of $550.

Ultimately, it looks like Sony has a lot of faith in their new top dog and we can’t wait to see how it performs. We were big fans of the A77, so we go into the A99 with fairly high hopes. But, only the test bench can tell if it lives up to the spec sheet.

RED SCARLET FIRST VIDEO TEST


Here is the first video I shot with a RED Scarlet I just purchased.
I was driving around last Wednesday when I bumped into Nick Metropolis (The King Of Collectible furniture on 100 So. La Brea LA)

Nick shared with me some great stories about the store. I was very impressed with the character of his soul and the kindness of his heart. Nick is not just running a one of a kind business he also helps everybody he comes in contact with including some of the local homeless by offering them work and shelter.
I was very impressed by the collectibles in the store from movie memorabilia to real antique film lighting equipment.
Nick rents the facilities for music videos, films and TV shows.
Recently they were asked to create a sizzle reel for a new show featuring the great characters of the Store.

Video specs:

ISO 800
50mm Nikon lens @ F1.4 and f2.8
ND filter Coking P154
Kenko circular Polarizer filter
The footage was color graded on RedCine- x pro and edited in premiere using colorista II and neat video.
I recorded on a 64G Red SSD card using
Redcode 8:1

Magic Lantern Firmware

Magic Lantern introduction from Trammell Hudson on Vimeo.

Download Here :http://www.magiclantern.fm/download
Magic Lantern is an open platform for developing enhancements to the amazing Canon 5D Mark II and 550D/T2i digital SLRs. These cameras are “game changing” for independent film makers:
It allows the use of a wide range of lenses (anything that can be adapted to the EF mount).
The 5D’s 35mm full-frame sensor is larger than the RED ONE’s sensor, Super 35 film. It is approximately the size of VistaVision. This means shallower native depth-of-field than anything on the market, except for the Phantom 65.
The dynamic range and latitude are close to the capabilities of high-end HD cameras.
The low-light performance is currently unrivaled, even by the RED ONE.
But, the software in video mode has limitations, even after the recent 1.1.0 upgrade from Canon that fixed the most glaring manual exposure “bug”.
That’s where Magic Lantern comes in — it turns your 5D Mark II into a 5D Mark Free. We’ve written extensions and widgets that fix many of the annoyances in working with the 5D Mark II on a film or video set. Our first set of fixes are targeted at the audio limitations of the camera, but there are some video enhancements included, too:

On-screen audio meters
Manual gain control with no AGC
Zebra stripes (video peaking)
Custom Cropmarks for 16:9, 2.35:1, 4:3 and any other format
Control of focus and bracketing
Beyond those features, however, is the ability to write your own extensions or to commission new ones. Within some limitations, we can fix many of the Canon firmware problems and plan to write widgets to address the requirements of the film users of this amazing camera.

Lytro promises to reinvent consumer point-and-shoot cameras

Start here. Get to know the basics. from Lytro on Vimeo.

A Silicon Valley startup called Lytro promises to reinvent consumer point-and-shoot cameras with its new digital model. The Lytro “light field” camera looks like no other and lets you focus or re-focus your pictures on a computer after you take them.
If you had to give an award for the year’s most breakthrough piece of consumer tech, there’s a good chance it would go to Lytro, a camera company which recently unveiled its first product. Unlike other cameras, you never need to focus it. Rather, the images it takes are interactive you can change their focus later, meaning that you can take pictures of a fleeting moment without having to check whether the right thing was in the picture. And because the camera never needs focusing or adjustments, it never has any shutter lag. It is truly just a point and shoot.

Here is Dream Music Part 1


Dream Music: Part 2 from Marc Donahue on Vimeo.

Created by: Marc Donahue & Sean Michael Williams
Dream Music: Part II is a musical voyage into the depths of the subconscious. This lyrical narrative reflects on the perception of time within dreams and waking life. Filmed on location in 2 states over the course of 6 months, we explored our new production technique of what we call ‘lyric-lapsing’, to achieve the surrealistic feeling of movement. We built upon the foundation of Part 1 with ambitious ideas that usually took around 6-8 hours of work for 3-4 seconds of footage. Our goal was to pioneer a new film genre by telling a story through art and music. Part 2 was made to transport the viewer from their own reality into a world of dreams and at the end, they awake to wonder how we were able to take them there. Each scene was born from the symbolic meaning of the lyrics and overall message of the film; Time is the illusion within the dream of life.
Starring and Produced by Beau Brigham
Produced by Gus Winkelman
Here is Dream Music Part 1 – vimeo.com/37830810
Thanks to dynamicperception.com for our sponsorship and support with equipment!
Songs by, Joelistics: Days, Rabbits Running: Making Castles, dredg: Brushstroke-Reprise/Matroshka/The Ornament
For Fan Inquiries Contact – DreamMusicPart2@Gmail.com
For Booking/Business/Press Inquiries Contact – Film@e11venmediagroup.com
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